Vesicular Stomatitis

8-9-05

Craig Daily Press, Colorado, USA [edited]
http://www.craigdailypress.com/section/frontpage_lead/story/18269

A horse in Moffat County was diagnosed Monday with the county's 1st
case of vesicular stomatitis (VS), a highly contagious disease.

Craig veterinarian Wayne Davis confirmed the case in a middle-aged
female horse. This is the 23rd case of the disease in Colorado this
summer.

Vesicular stomatitis is a viral illness similar to foot and mouth
disease. It gives horses, cattle, pigs and sheep sores and lesions on
the mouth, hooves, nipples and teats. The lesions can become so sore
animals won't eat and rapidly lose weight.

The disease can spread to humans, but according to the Colorado
Department of Agriculture, human cases are very rare.

Statewide, there are 22 ranches under quarantine for the disease. If
one animal is found on a ranch with the disease, the entire ranch is
quarantined until 3 weeks after the disease heals on every animal.
The disease, which is rarely fatal, is spread by flies and direct
contact with infected animals.

This is the 1st case of vesicular stomatitis Davis has ever dealt
with. He said the horse came in with lesions that looked similar to
foot and mouth disease. Davis sent lab results to the U.S. Department
of Agriculture, which confirmed the disease.

Davis said the infected horse will get over the disease "fairly soon."

The disease heals naturally over time, Davis said, but he gave the
horse antibiotics to ward off any secondary infections. Linh Truong,
a spokeswoman with the Colorado Department of Agriculture, said
vesicular stomatitis is a concern because it closely resembles foot
and mouth disease and because it causes rapid weight loss.

"We keep track of it closely," Truong said.

Truong said Moffat County did not have any confirmed cases of the
disease in 2004, but wasn't sure about before that.

Horses can be vaccinated for the disease [Not true: see comment below
- Mod.LM], but Truong said the vaccinations are not a 100-percent
guarantee. In areas where a lot of horses have the disease, Truong
recommends getting a booster shot, but she said Moffat County isn't
one of those places. The vaccination and booster shot are available
at most veterinarians, Truong said.

Utah has 46 premises under quarantine, 30 of them right across the
border in Uintah County.

A horse show had to be moved from Vernal, Utah to Craig in July 2005
because of fears of vesicular stomatitis.

Beau Benson, a veterinarian in Vernal, said the disease is starting
to taper off, but it hasn't gone away. Benson has dealt with about a
dozen cases of vesicular stomatitis in horses and 2 human cases.

In the human case, Benson said a mother and daughter got the disease
when a horse sneezed in their face. The mother and daughter are doing
fine, Benson said.

Shawn Polly of Craig said the disease isn't something he worries too
much about.

"It's like a person catching a cold," Polly said Monday as he loaded
his horse into his trailer at the Moffat County Fairgrounds. Polly
had both of his horses vaccinated and said he doesn't plan on getting
them a booster shot.
~~~~

[This article is in error in indicating there is a vaccine for VS. In
a conversation with Linh Truong of the Colorado Department of
Agriculture, she clarified that there is a horse vaccine for West
Nile virus but not for VS.  Ms. Truong stated that she would call the
Craig Daily Press and ask for a correction to be printed.

It is additionally confusing that Mr Polly believes West Nile virus
or VS to be so mild. Horses suffering from Vesicular stomatitis are
unmistakably ill and may lose weight because it is painful for them
to eat or drink. Additionally they may be lame.

Horses with West Nile virus are generally very ill and may die. The
WNV vaccine is often recommended as a 2-dose vaccine, with 3 to 6
weeks between the doses. There are cases of horses having milder
disease and not dying from WNV.

So the article seems to have confused 2 different equine diseases.
However, Colorado does have Vesicular stomatitis in Montrose County
in cattle and in Delta County in Horses. Both cases were confirmed in
July 2005.

------------------------

6-20-05

Utah has two confirmed cases of VS...

On June 17, 2005, the National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL)
in Ames, IA, confirmed the finding of vesicular stomatitis (VS) in a
horse on a premises in Garfield County, Utah.  This is the first
confirmed case of vesicular stomatitis in the State of Utah in 2005.
Utah had no cases of vesicular stomatitis in 2004.

The two affected horses were taken on a pleasure ride on May 22nd in
the southeastern part of the State along the Escalante river where the
owner noticed an abundance of biting flies and insects.  The owner
first noticed the animals were sick a little over a week later on May
31.

A subsequent case of vesicular stomatitis also was diagnosed by NVSL on
June 17 in a horse on a premises in Davis county, UT.  Vesicular
stomatitis has not been seen in this part of the State in past
outbreaks.

The USDA's latest reports indicate 17 premises are under VS quarantine in
Arizona; and 1 each are under quarantine in New Mexico and Texas.

Prior to moving livestock to other states, ensure you have met all entry
requirements.  Contact information for state veterinarians' offices and
updated reports are available on the TAHC web site at
http://www.tahc.state.tx.us.

As always, if animals on your premises exhibit blistering, sores or
excessive drooling, contact your private veterinarian or state
veterinarian's office.
In Texas,
the 24-hour number for the Texas Animal Health Commission is 1-800-550-8242.

David E Anderson, DVM, MS, DACVS
Head and Associate Professor of Farm Animal Surgery
Director, International Camelid Initiative
Ohio State University
College of Veterinary Medicine

 

-----------------------------------

5-24-05   Vesicular Stomatitis in Texas,  New Mexico and Arizona

News Release
Texas Animal Health Commission
Box l2966 . Austin, Texas 78711 . (800) 550-8242 . FAX (512) 719-071
Bob Hillman, DVM . Executive Director
For info, contact Carla Everett, information officer, at
1-800-550-8242, ext. 710, or
ceverett@tahc.state.tx.us<mailto:ceverett@tahc.state.tx.us>
 

For Immediate Release---
And Now There are Three.
Texas Joins States with Vesicular Stomatitis in 2005
 
Texas, on Friday, May 20, joined New Mexico and Arizona as states with
confirmed cases of vesicular stomatitis (VS) this spring.  Two Travis
County horses were hauled home May 10 from a trail ride in Arizona,
where they apparently were exposed to the virus that can cause animals
to develop blisters and sores in the mouth, on the tongue, muzzle, teats
and hooves.   The year's first VS cases were confirmed April 27 in two
horses in southwest New Mexico.  Since then, infection has been detected
in 17 horses on 11 premises in New Mexico, Arizona, and now, Texas. 
 
"A number of states and countries impose strict testing, permitting and
inspection requirements for livestock that originate from VS-affected
areas or states.  Check with the state or country of destination before
hauling livestock from Texas," said Dr. Bob Hillman, head of the Texas
Animal Health Commission (TAHC), the state's livestock and poultry
health regulatory agency.  Phone numbers for other states' animal health
regulatory agencies can be obtained from the TAHC's Austin headquarters
at 1-800-550-8242. Staff at the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Austin
office can be reached at 512-916-5565 for international shipping rules
or restrictions.
 
"VS rarely causes death, but an animal can suffer several weeks, while
the lesions heal," said Dr. Bob Hillman, who also serves as Texas' state
veterinarian.  "To help prevent the spread of VS, an infected animal and
the other livestock on a premises are quarantined until at least 30 days
after the sores heal. Prior to releasing movement restrictions, a
regulatory veterinarian will examine the affected animal to ensure
healing is complete.  Other livestock also will be checked. If infection
is detected, the quarantine will begin anew."
 
Dr. Hillman explained that the clinical signs of VS mirror those of the
dreaded foreign foot-and-mouth (FMD) disease.  Horses are susceptible to
VS, but not FMD; however, both diseases can affect cattle, sheep, goats,
swine, deer and a number of other species.  "When sores or blisters are
seen in FMD-susceptible animals, we must immediately rule out an
introduction of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD). When horses have lesions,
a VS test rules out other possible causes for blisters and sores,
including toxic plants, chemicals or poison.  Tests are run at no charge
to the animal owner, and the VS diagnosis in horses is confirmed at the
National Veterinary Services Laboratory (NVSL) in Ames, IA."
 
Dr. Hillman noted that the disease occurs sporadically, but outbreaks
generally follow a 10- to 15-year cycle.  In l982-83, the country
suffered its worst recorded VS outbreak, when infection was confirmed on
617 premises in nine states: Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, Utah,
Wyoming, Idaho, Montana, Nebraska and South Dakota. 
 
Subsequent outbreaks in l995, l997 and l998 were limited to New Mexico,
Colorado and Texas, with a few cases in Arizona.   Last year, Arizona
was "spared," when Texas had 15 VS cases, New Mexico had 80, and
Colorado, 199.

Livestock owners and private veterinary practitioners are urged to
report suspected cases of VS to their respective state's livestock
health regulatory agency:
Texas Animal Health Commission --  1-800-550-8242 (operational 24 hours
a day)
New Mexico Livestock Board --          1-505-841-6161
Colorado Department of Agriculture, State Veterinarian's Office --
1-303-239-4161
Arizona Department of Agriculture,  State Veterinarian's Office --
1-602-542-4293

The TAHC's web site at
http://www.tahc.state.tx.us<http://www.tahc.state.tx.us/> has
additional information on VS and a link to the U.S. Department of
Agriculture, where situation reports, maps and movement restrictions and
requirements are posted.                                               
           
  --30-- 

5-5-05                       Vesicular Stomatitis Detected in Arizona   

For your information. Remember this is a disease that can, but rarely does, occur in camelids. Very little risk of mortaility, but quite contagious so it results in significant constraint on movement in effected areas.

 

 

David E Anderson, DVM, MS, DACVS
Head and Associate Professor of Farm Animal Surgery
Director, International Camelid Initiative
Ohio State University
College of Veterinary Medicine
601 Vernon L Tharp Street
Columbus, Ohio 43210
Phone 614-292-6661
Fax: 614-292-3530
E-mail: Anderson.670@osu.edu

 

News Alert
Texas Animal Health Commission
Box l2966 • Austin, Texas 78711 • (800) 550-8242 • FAX (512) 719-071
Bob Hillman, DVM • Executive Director
For info, contact Carla Everett, information officer, at 1-800-550-8242, ext. 710, or ceverett@tahc.state.tx.us


Vesicular Stomatitis Detected in Arizona

Vesicular stomatitis (VS) has been detected in a horse on a premises in Maricopa County, Arizona. (Maricopa County is located in the south-central portion of the state and is home to Phoenix.) The owner of the five-year-old gelding reported that the animal was purchased about three weeks ago.  Sores appeared in the horse's mouth in mid-April, and tests run at the National Veterinary Services Laboratory in Ames, IA, confirmed the infection.   Arizona was "spared" in the 2004 VS outbreak, when Texas had 15 cases, New Mexico had 80, and Colorado 199.

One premises in Grant County, New Mexico, remains quarantined where two horses are recovering from the viral blistering disease.  Infected and susceptible animals remain under movement prohibition until at least 30 days after all lesions heal, and a state or federal regulatory veterinarian examines the livestock.

VS can cause blisters and sores in the mouth, and on the tongue, muzzle, teats or hooves of horses, cattle, swine, sheep, goats, llamas and a number of other animals.  Lesions usually will heal in two or three weeks.  Because the signs of VS mimic those of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), animal health officials strongly urge livestock owners and caretakers to report potential cases of VS to their private veterinary practitioner or state livestock health officials.  Laboratory tests run at no charge to the producer will differentiate whether infection is caused by VS and not FMD, a dreaded foreign animal disease.

To report suspected cases of VS, owners and private veterinary practitioners should call their respective state's livestock health regulatory agency:
Texas Animal Health Commission --  1-800-550-8242 (operational 24 hours a day)
New Mexico Livestock Board --          1-505-841-6161
Colorado Department of Agriculture, State Veterinarian's Office -- 1-303-239-4161
Arizona Department of Agriculture,  State Veterinarian's Office -- 1-602-542-4293

Prior to moving livestock from Arizona or New Mexico, check with the state of destination to ensure all VS testing and inspection requirements have been fulfilled.  The Texas Animal Health Commission (TAHC) requires livestock from affected states to be accompanied by a valid certificate of veterinary inspection (health paper) on which the accredited veterinarian certifies the animals are not from a quarantined premises. The TAHC web page is at http://www.tahc.state.tx.us.

Kentucky embargoes livestock and wild or exotic animals from counties that include and surround the infected premises, and place strict entry requirements on animals from the remainder of the state, or even other states that share a common border with an infected county.  To access specific Kentucky requirements, go to: http://www.kyagr.com/state_vet/ah/vsv_embargo.htm.

Florida animal health officials require susceptible animals coming from VS-affected states to have prior permission for entry and a negative test for VS within 10 days prior to entry. The certificate of veterinary inspection also must include a statement that the animals are free of clinical signs of VS and have not been exposed or located within 10 miles of a positive premises within the previous 30 days.  The Florida Department of Agriculture web site is at:  http://doacs.state.fl.us/.


                                                       --30--


 

 

10-21-04

News Release
 Texas Animal Health Commission
    Box l2966  * Austin, Texas 78711 * (800) 550-8242 * FAX (512) 719-0719
Bob Hillman, DVM  *  Executive Director
  For info, contact Carla Everett, information officer, at 1-800-550-8242, ext. 710,
 or ceverett@tahc.state.tx.us

For immediate release:
All Vesicular Stomatitis (VS) Quarantines Released in Texas
 
For the first time since May 19, Texas has no animals or herds restricted because of Vesicular Stomatitis (VS), a blistering disease that can temporarily debilitate affected equine animals, cattle, goats, deer, swine or other susceptible species. VS occurs every few years in the Southwest, and the virus is thought to be transmitted by sand flies and black flies.  Animals affected by the disease usually begin to heal several weeks after exhibiting blisters, sloughing of skin or sores in and around the mouth, above the hooves, or on the muzzle or teats.
 
“Texas was the first of three states to have VS infection this year.  Throughout the summer, laboratory tests confirmed infection in horses and cattle on 15 Texas premises in eight counties. On October 18, the final Texas quarantine was released. This premise, in Kerr County, had been quarantined in early September, when VS infection was confirmed in a horse.  We currently have no VS cases or quarantines, and no active VS investigations,” explained Dr. Bob Hillman, Texas’ state veterinarian and head of the Texas Animal Health Commission (TAHC), the state’s livestock and poultry health regulatory agency.  Texas counties with confirmed VS cases this summer were Reeves, Val Verde, Uvalde, Starr, Yoakum, Kerr, Bandera and Dimmit.  Animal health officials lift premise quarantines 30 days after the animals heal from the VS lesions.
 
Dr. Hillman said that releasing the last VS quarantine in the state will make it easier to ship Texas livestock to other states. He recommended, however, that producers and private veterinary practitioners continue to check with states of destination prior to transporting animals, to ensure all entry requirements are met. 
 
As of mid-October, 107 premises in 22 Colorado counties, and 39 premises in eight New Mexico counties remain quarantined, due to VS infection. VS-infected animals in these states include horses, cattle, an alpaca, a llama, and several sheep and goats.
 
“VS rarely causes death in affected animals, but it is painful to animals, due to blisters and sloughing of skin. When VS strikes cattle or other cloven-hooved animals, laboratory tests are essential, because VS lesions mimic those of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), a highly dangerous foreign animal disease. Even though horses are not susceptible to FMD, we still recommend testing, to determine whether the lesions were caused by VS, a toxic plant or poison,” said Dr. Bob Hillman.
 
“As always, we urge producers to call their private veterinary practitioner and their state animal health officials if livestock or poultry exhibit unusual signs of disease,” said Dr. Hillman.  These signs may include blistering or sores around the animal’s mouth, hooves or teats; widespread illness or unexpected death loss in a herd or flock; unusual ticks or maggots; or animals that stagger or are unable to rise or walk. 
 
To make a report, owners and private veterinary practitioners should call:
Texas Animal Health Commission --  1-800-550-8242
New Mexico Livestock Board --          1-505-841-6161
Colorado Department of Agriculture, State Veterinarians Office 1-303-239-4161
                                                                                 
  --30--  

----------------------------------------

 

 

Vesicular Stomatitis

7-22-04

For the latest information on Vesicular Stomatitis (VSV)
These sites are updated frequently.


http://www.tahc.state.tx.us
Scroll down several articles about VSV

http://www.ag.state.co.us
Several items about VSV

____________________________________________

7-8-04

Vesicular Stomatitis

The reappearance of this disease was confirmed today by the Colorado
state veterinarian's office.  There are two confirmed cases in horses in
the Trinidad area and one in central Douglas county, also in a horse.

This disease can affect nearly all livestock.  Look for vesicles on the
feet and inside the mouth.  Animals could be off their feed.  The
infection is naturally-occurring and symptoms can last between a week
and a month, although most of the duration is recuperation rather than
active infection.  The state will quarantine an infected premises for
the duration of the infection, which is not life-threatening but is
transmissible.

Check
http://www.ag.state.co.us/animals/VSV/default.html
http://www.ag.state.co.us/animals/livestock_disease/vsbroc.html

What can you do to minimize your risk?  Fly control is the best answer.
The current belief is that the black, biting flies we have here are
the primary vector.  However, transmission by direct contact could still
be possible and therefore the following steps have been taken:

No livestock from Colorado, New Mexico, or Texas will be allowed to
enter the Commonwealth of Kentucky.  This is critical information for
anyone who has entered animals into the LFA.  Those from surrounding
states will want to monitor the situation.  This prohibition is likely
to last for months.

Unless you have a life-threatening emergency, do not take an animal to
CSU without verifying with your vet the need for a Certificate of
Veterinary Inspection.  The hospital needs to remain free of the
infection or they, too, could be quarantined.

The state vet's office has been helpful on this, and I have volunteered,
as always, to be our go-between.  Please let me know if you have
questions and I will be glad to funnel them upward and get back to you
with the answers.

Teri Nilson Baird

---------------------------------
Update  6-28-04
 Texas Animal Health Commission
    Box l2966  * Austin, Texas 78711 * (800) 550-8242 * FAX (512) 719-0719
Bob Hillman, DVM  *  Executive Director
  For info, contact Carla Everett, information officer, at 1-800-550-8242,
ext. 710,  or ceverett@tahc.state.tx.us

 New Mexico Livestock Board
300 San Mateo Blvd NE, Suite 1000
Albuquerque, NM  87108-1500 . (505) 841-6161 . FAX (505) 841-6160
Steven R. England, DVM . State Veterinarian

For release---  
Vesicular Stomatitis (VS) Case Count Climbs in Texas
 
Six more premises in Texas have horses with confirmed cases of vesicular
stomatitis (VS), reports the Texas Animal Health Commission (TAHC), the
state's livestock and poultry health regulatory agency.  The most recent
cases, were confirmed this week through laboratory tests, and include horses
on a ranch in Uvalde County and, in south Texas, horses on four premises in
Starr County, and one premises near Carrizo Springs in Dimmitt County.
 
Thirteen premises now are under quarantine in Texas and New Mexico because
of the sporadically occurring VS virus that can cause affected livestock to
develop painful blisters in the mouth, on the tongue, above the hooves, or
on the teats.  To date, the infection has been confined to about 25 horses
in both states, but cattle, goats, swine, deer and some other livestock may
be affected. The disease is thought to be transmitted by sand flies and
black flies, but all aspects of the disease are not fully understood,
because outbreaks occur infrequently.  This year's outbreak, the first since
1998, began in mid-May and could potentially continue until late fall.  In
addition to the most recent cases, a ranch in each of the following counties
remains under quarantine:
.         One ranch in Reeves County in far west Texas, the first case
confirmed this year
.         One ranch in Yoakum County, near Denver City, about 80 miles
southwest of Lubbock
.         One ranch in Val Verde County, about 150 miles west of San Antonio
 
Horses on four small premises in New Mexico, near Carlsbad, also are
quarantined because of VS.
 
VS-infected animals, and all other susceptible livestock, are confined to
their premise until 30 days after all lesions heal.  This helps assure that
infected animals do not spread the disease through direct contact with other
livestock.  Affected animals may become weak, due to their inability to eat,
due to blisters or erosions in their mouth or around their muzzles.  While
generally not life-threatening, care should be taken to assure that infected
animals do not develop secondary infections, due to open sores that may
require several weeks to heal.   Prior to quarantine release, the animals
will be re-examined by a state or federal regulatory veterinarian, to ensure
healing
 
States may place additional testing requirements or restrictions on
livestock originating from states with VS infection, so owners and private
veterinary practitioners are urged to check with receiving states prior to
shipping animals.  The TAHC has directed private veterinary practitioners to
carefully inspect animals for VS, and document the exam on certificates of
veterinary inspection (health papers) issued for livestock leaving Texas.  A
similar statement also is required on paperwork for livestock entering Texas
from other states with VS infection.  
 
Owners and practitioners are urged to contact state livestock health
officials, if they see potential signs of VS in livestock, so laboratory
confirmation tests may be conducted.  In Texas, the TAHC is operational 24
hours a day at 1-800-550-8242, with a TAHC or U.S. Department of Agriculture
veterinarian always on call to take reports and work with veterinary
practitioners.  In New Mexico, producers should make reports to the New
Mexico Livestock Board at 505-841-6161.
 
--30--

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